Sensory Experience of Perception


These individuals influenced my artistic or intellectual growth.  This page is an ongoing project.

Walter Benjamin

Richard Diebenkorn

Clarence Glacken - geography professor at Berkeley, has his own section below. It may well evolve into an essay on the history of environmental thought.

Muriel Goodwin - friend, painter.

Ms Goodwin provided encouragement and insightful criticism of my paintings. When she worked in my studio it was like having a master class.

Alfred Leslie - painter, instructor.

Erle Loran - art professor at U. C. Berkeley.

Loran's book, Cezanne’s Composition: Analyses of His Form with Diagrams and Photographs of his Motifs, chronicles the time Loran lived in Cezanne's studio in France, photographing motifs of Cezanne's paintings, and analyzing the way Cezanne altered the paintings to produce an acceptable composition. 

I profited from reading his book and from the painting classes I took from him. He was a living connection to the beginnings of Abstract Expressionism and the Bay Area art and cultural scene that I experienced in the 1960's. (See Landauer, The San Francisco School of Abstract Expressionism.) 

In the third week of 2018 I visited Cezanne's studio, and took a guided tour of the quarry Bibimus, both places where Cezanne painted. Seeing the actual motifs helped me to understand the extent of  his reorganization of the optical reality of the motifs. 

Cezanne is generally understood to have played a major role in the transition from representational art to non-objective art.

Gottardo Piazzoni - Swiss-born Bay Area painter.

Harold Webb - chemistry teacher El Monte High School, sponsor of the chemistry team and minerology club.

Mr. Webb provided a  rigorous grounding in science and mathematics that has been invaluable throughout my life. On minerology club field trips he encouraged me to paint landscapes and spoke well of my efforts.

Art is Really Important

Gurdon Miller background image on

Clarence Glacken - geography professor at U. C. Berkeley.

Mr. Glacken introduced his students to the study of the history of ideas. He team-taught, with Paul Wheatley, Geography 100A and 100B, the two semester upper division class in geographic thought required of all Berkeley Geography majors and those graduate students who came to Berkeley from other colleges and universities.

Had I not encountered these two individuals, from whom I took as many courses as I could, it is unlikely that I would have remained in school. The content of their classes and the intellectual breadth of their lectures and publications kept me in Berkeley and continue to inspire me.

Glacken taught and wrote about the relationship between culture  and the environment. His book, Traces on the Rhodian Shore, is widely recognized as the most important environmental book written in the twentieth century.

I have been aware for many years of the existence of a file box of Mr. Glacken's unpublished manuscripts and wished I could explore its contents. In 2017 the University of Virginia Press published Genealogies of Environmentalism: the Lost Works of Clarence Glacken, based, in part on the contents of this file box. I preordered several copies and have given the book to many friends.

As I read, and reread, the book I find myself imagining discussions with its author as I discover connections between what he was thinking more than 50 years ago and what I am thinking about and working on now. [follow up with examples from art and planning e.g..,  sensory experience of perception and environmental perception] 


spacer


Caspar Institute logo293 unique visitors since 18 May 2018
updated: 18 May 2018 (m)
content copyright ©2018 by Gurdon Miller
design copyright ©2018 by the Caspar Institute





sitemap